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On December 17th, 2002 the Richmond Hill Republican Club was officially designated a Landmark and it is now safe from being demolished.

Due to the strong support from all of our members with special mention to Nancy Cataldi, Carl Ballenas, Ivan Mrakovcic, and NYC Council members Dennis Gallagher & Melinda Katz; the Richmond Hill Republican Club will be protected by its new Landmark designation.

Although this is a recent honor, the struggle began back in the 1980's when the Richmond Hill Development Corp. fought hard to protect and restore its architectural integrity.

From the outset, the goal of the Richmond Hill Historical Society was to gain this Landmark status in recognition of its architectural significance which is tightly woven into the history of Richmond Hill and also to resurrect the Club back to a community center for all to enjoy.

This marks a great day for Richmond Hill and is the start of a promising bright future for the New Year of 2003!
 

Photo of Mission Chair
Photo of Mission Chair
Photo of Tin Ceiling
Photo of Tin Ceiling
 

About The Richmond Hill Republican Club
From the Book- 'Victorian Richmond Hill'

Located- Richmond Hill, NY between Hillside Ave., and Jamaica Ave. on Lefferts Blvd.

Photo of The Richmond Hill Republican ClubThe Richmond Hill Republican Club building looks virtually the same as it did at the turn of the century. Plate glass double doors still admit visitors to the oak columned interior with its leather-cushioned booths. Oak pews originally used for seating in the main meeting room have been replaced by, more modern, moveable chairs. An elaborate tin ceiling soars to about 25 feet above a solitary mission podium table. Other examples of the old mission furniture are around the clubhouse or in the section of the building where the post office used to be. Oak sliding doors span about 18 feet of the main meeting room. They are in four sections and operate on two tracks. The lower part of the building was used as a club bowling alley but it is now a public archery range. Much of the original oak paneling remains, and lincrusta-walton lines the Club's bar. An old Western Electric phone booth has been converted to a closet, but the whole building, especially with its signed photographs of Coolidge, Harding and Teddy Roosevelt, evokes images of the heyday of Republican politics in New York. According to one older resident, in those days, everyone was a Republican.
 

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